Future Perfect

Breaking Down the Future Perfect Tense

The Future perfect tense shows that an action will have been completed before another action or a specific time in the future. This verb tense is formed by using will + have with the past participle of the main verb.

See practical examples:
  • We will have had two kids in the next five years.
  • By the time I meet Laurel tonight I will have finished my studies.
  • I will have written two books when Fortune returns from college.
  • By the time I get home Gift will have cooked dinner.

How to Make Use of The Future Perfect Tense

1.  Expression of Affirmative Statements with Future Perfect Tense: To make affirmative statement with future perfect tense, the structure: (subject) + will have + past participle of main verb is used.

Examples include:
  • I will have eaten dinner before I go to bed.
  • We’re late. By the time we get to the church, the service will have started already.
  • Alice will have returned from work when I get home.

2.  Expression of Negative Statements with Future Perfect Tense: To make negative statement with future perfect tense, the structure: subject + will not have + past participle of main verb is used.

Examples include:
  • Dinner is taking longer to cook than I thought. When Laurel returns, I will not have finished cooking dinner.
  • The traffic situation is terrible. Laurel will not have arrived home before dinner is cooked.
  • Geoffrey is leaving for church early; the service will not have started by the time he arrives there.

3.  Expression of Interrogative Statements with Future Perfect Tense: To make interrogative statements with future perfect tense, the structure: (interrogative word) + will + subject + have + past participle of main verb is used.

Examples include:
  • It seems the cooking is taking longer than usual. When Laurel returns, will you have finished cooking dinner?
  • The traffic situation is terrible. Will Laurel have arrived home before dinner is cooked?
  • Now that Geoffrey is leaving for church early, will the service have started by the time he arrives there?

4.  Expression of Negative Interrogative Statements with Future Perfect Tense: To make negative interrogative statements with future perfect tense, the structure: (interrogative word) + will + subject + not have + past participle of main verb is used.

Examples include:
  • It seems dinner is almost done. When Laurel returns, will you not have finished cooking dinner?
  • The traffic situation is terrible. Will Laurel not have arrived home before dinner is cooked?
  • Now that Geoffrey is leaving for church late, will the service not have started by the time he arrives there?

Using Future Perfect + a Length of Time

Future Perfect + a length of time has the same meaning as future perfect progressive. When it is used with a length time, future perfect can also mean the same as the future perfect progressiveOpens in new window.

See practical examples
  • When we finally get to Los Angeles, I will have driven for six hours. (Future perfect)
  • When we finally get to Los Angeles, I will have been driving for six hours. (Future perfect progressive)

These two sentences mean the same thing. however, not all verbs can be used with future perfect to get this meaning.


    The Four Aspects of Future Tense
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