Synonymia

Definition & Examples of Synonymia

Synonymia (“Putting together words of like signification”, derives from the Greek “syn,” – alike and “onoma,” – name), is a rhetorical device which consists in putting together words of like signification in one sentence.

The synonymia is a compilation of words or expressions implying all the same meaning, or conveying the same idea; as, the following examples:

Notable Examples
  •  Is it not a certain mark and token of intolerable arrogancy and venomous envy, where the tongue is still exercised in depraving, slandering, defacing, deriding, and condemning, other men’s words and works?
  •  Enter not into the path of the wicked, and go not in the way of evil men. Avoid it, pass not by it, turn from it, and pass away.
Important Hint! 

This figure must be employed, when we are sensible that one single word cannot sufficiently express the dignity or greatness of the thought or expression. Nevertheless, great care must be taken to employ none but such words as embellish the discourse. For nothing can be more flat and and insipid than a long chain of synonymous words thrown in without any manner of necessity.

Further Readings:
Silver Rhetoricae, Figures | SynonymiaOpens in new window
John Shaw, A Methodical English Grammar: Containing Rules and Directions for Speaking [...] | SynonymiaOpens in new window