Apocalypse

An Introduction to Apocalypse

Apocalypse (derives from Greek ‘apokálypsis’ meaning “an uncovering”), is a phantasmagoricalOpens in new window allegoryOpens in new window whose theme is the revelation of things to come in the future, or things to happen in the present. In the sphere of religionOpens in new window, it is usually a revelation of something hidden — a vision of heavenly secrets that can make sense of earthly realities.

The revelation may be made through a dream, as in the Book of DanielOpens in new window, or through a vision, as in the Book of RevelationOpens in new window. In biblical accounts of revelations the manner of the revelation and its reception is generally described. — (Wikipedia, Apocalypse)

Notable Examples of Apocalypse
  • ‘Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
    Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
    The blood-dimeed tide is loosed, and everywhere
    The ceremony of innocence is drowned.’
  • — W. B. Yeats, ‘Second coming’

  • ‘And they beheld Him in the chariot, clothed in the glory of the brightness, having raiment as of sun, fair as the moon and terrible that for awe they durst not look upon Him. And there came a voice out of heaven, calling: Elijah! Elijah! And he answered with a main cry: Abba! Adonai! And they beheld Him, even Him, ben Bloom Elijah, amid clouds of angels ascend to the glory of the brightness at an angle of fortyfive degrees over Donohoe’s in Little Green street like a shot off a shovel’
  • — Joce, Ulysses
Further Readings:
Wikipedia | ApocalypseOpens in new window
Bernard Marie Dupriez | A Dictionary of Literary Devices: Gradus, A-Z: ApocalypseOpens in new window