Accumulatio

An Introduction to Accumulatio

Accumulatio (derives from a Latin verb, meaning “to amass”), is a figure of speechOpens in new window in which the various points made during a discourse are categorically presented again (this time), in a compact and forceful manner. This is usually achieved with a blend of climaxOpens in new window in the summation of the speech.

Examples of Accumulatio
  • “He [the defendant] is the betrayer of his own self-respect, and the waylayer of the self-respect of others; covetous, intemperate, irascible, arrogant; disloyal to his parents, ungrateful to his friends, troublesome to his kin; insulting to his betters, disdainful of his equals and mates, cruel to his inferiors; in short, he is intolerable to everyone.”
  • — Cicero, Ad Herennium
  • “He is the betrayer of his own self-respect, and the waylayer of the self-respect of others; covetous, intemperate, irascible, arrogant; disloyal to his parents, ungrateful to his friends, troublesome to his kin; insulting to his betters, disdainful of his equals and mates, cruel to his inferiors; in short, he is intolerable to everyone.”
  • — Cicero, Ad Herennium

Accumulatio is a broader part of EnumeratioOpens in new window.