RELATIVE CLAUSE

Examples of Relative Clauses in Sentences

A RELATIVE CLAUSE is a dependent clause which gives additional information about the head noun of the main clause.

    For example:
  • The book, that I read yesterday, was very interesting.
  • In this sentence, “book” → head noun of main clause: “The book was very interesting.” that I read yesterday → relative clause, giving additional information about the book

In English a relative clause is usually introduced by a relative pronoun, such as, who, whom, whose, what, which, and that or a relative adverb, such as where and when.

Fundamentals

    For example:
  • The person who plays badminton is Liam.
  • Here, “person” → head noun, “who” → relative pronoun, functioning as subject of “plays”, who plays badminton → relative clause, giving additional information about the person
    Consider another example:
  • The person whose book I borrowed has left.
  • Here, “person” → head noun, “whose” → possessive pronoun, whose book I borrowed → relative clause, giving additional information about the person
    Example 1:
  • The woman I saw yesterday was Gretchen.
  • Or
  • The woman (whom) I saw yesterday was Gretchen.
  • In this example, “woman” → head noun, “whom” → relative pronoun (omitted), functioning as direct object of “saw”. I saw yesterday → relative clause, giving additional information about the woman
    Example 2:
  • The book I read was interesting.
  • Or
  • The book (which or that) I read was interesting.
  • Here, “book” → head noun, “which” or “that” → relative pronoun (omitted), functioning as direct object of “read”, I read → relative clause, giving additional information about the book
    Example 3:
  • The student I spoke to was very nice.
  • Or
  • The student (to whom) I spoke was very nice.
  • In this example, “student” → head noun, “to whom” → relative pronoun (omitted), functioning as indirect object of “spoke”, I spoke to → relative clause, giving additional information about the student
    Example 4:
  • I went to the same school my brothers went to.
  • Or
  • I went to the same school (where) my brothers went.
  • Here, “school” → head noun, “where” → relative adverb (omitted) functioning as indirect object of “went”, my brothers went to → relative clause, giving additional information about the school.